Healthy and Well School Communities

These workshops have been developed for the use of NJAIS members only and are not to be downloaded, copied, used, or distributed without permission.

 

 

SUBSCRIPTION SERIES:

 

Healthy and Well School Communities

 

Hosted via:

 

This series includes the following topics:

Childhood Mental Health and Covid-19

Comprehensive Curricular Approach to Health and Wellness

Developing a Trauma-Sensitive Classroom: Who Cares?

Educator Burnout and Stress Reduction

Human Connection in an Educational Context

Knowing the Whole Student: How Issues of Race and Class Affect Student Mental Health

Managing Stress, Anxiety, and Behavior for Students with Interrupted Learning Experience

Meet the Parents: Understanding and Connecting with the “Other” Adults in Your Students’ Lives 

Reconnecting to our “Why”

Resiliency in Childhood and Adolescents

 


 

REGISTER HERE

 

These offerings are available by subscription only.  
Registration includes unlimited participants in each of the sessions, as well as access to the recordings and resources to be shared within your school community only.

What this means:
You can send your entire faculty to each of the listed sessions for the flat fee.
If permission is granted by the presenter, you can use the recording to view as an entire faculty at a time convenient for your schedule.  
Recordings will be available for three weeks following the session.
Your school has unlimited access to this robust series of workshops and presentations.

When you register:
You will indicate one point person who will communicate which members of your school community will attend each individual session.
This point person will be the liaison between NJAIS and the school for all topics relating to this subscription series.
Each session will have a Zoom registration link.  Those who would like to attend those sessions should register at least 48 hours in advance of the session in order to receive their unique Zoom link.

Fees are per SCHOOL - A flat fee for your entire school community.

NJAIS Member Schools:
$500 for schools with enrollment of 200 and fewer
$650 for schools with enrollment of 201 - 500
$800 for schools with enrollment of 501 - 750
$975 for schools with enrollment of 751+ 

Non-Member Colleagues:
$1,500 for subscription series enrollment

 

Session dates, descriptions, and presenters below:
*Dates, topics, and presenters subject to change*

 

Tuesday, November 30, 2021; 1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. 

Childhood Mental Health and Covid-19

Mental health disorders are the most common health issues among school-aged children. Educators are often the first to notice the signs and symptoms of a mental health disorder in children and adolescents. This workshop entails a discussion of the signs and symptoms of some of the most common mental health disorders, including ADHD, depression, and anxiety, and gives educators immediately applicable strategies to identify students who need support. Special attention will be paid to the ways these phenomena may present differently during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.


Presented by: David Friedlander, PsyD, is a clinical psychologist in the Mood Disorders Center at the Child Mind Institute. He specializes in providing evidence-based treatments for children, adolescents and young adults with mood disorders, co-occurring anxiety disorders, borderline personality disorder and school refusal. He has received specialized training in cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and motivational interviewing (MI), and he has recently completed a Behavioral Tech Foundational Course in dialectical behavior therapy (DBT). Dr. Friedlander has extensive experience in community mental health outpatient and school settings. He has worked with parents, teachers and other community supports to design behavior plans for use in the home and at school. These evidence-based plans frequently emphasized skill development and involved cognitive, behavioral and mindfulness-based strategies. During quarantine, Dr. Friedlander led weekly online mindfulness meditation sessions for members of his community. He has recently developed an interest in, and presented on, the intersection of technology use (particularly gaming) and mental health. His previous research focused primarily on the mental health needs of ethnic minorities, and he co-authored a chapter in the American Psychiatric Association’s Black Mental Health. Dr. Friedlander strives to help people experience greater mindfulness and self-compassion in their daily endeavors. He is dedicated to enhancing the lives of children and families by providing them with empathic, evidenced-based care in pursuit of their treatment goals.

 

Thursday, December 2, 2021; 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m. 

Managing Stress, Anxiety, and Behavior for Students with Interrupted Learning Experience

 

Across schools, up to 15% of the student population may demonstrate behavior problems stemming from a range of mental health and learning disorders. Difficult student behaviors contribute to chaotic classroom and home environments, student stress, decreased academic engagement and adult burnout. This workshop will engage participants in an interactive discussion on how to provide structure and increase positive behavior, utilizing proactive techniques drawn from the most up-to-date behavioral research.

Presented by: Joanna R. Stern, PsyD., is a senior clinical psychologist and the director of the Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) Outpatient Program within the Mood Disorders Center at the Child Mind Institute. She has experience in the evaluation and treatment of children and adolescents across a variety of settings, including inpatient, residential, intensive and traditional outpatient psychotherapy. For over a decade, Dr. Stern has treated children and adolescents with mood disorders, with a special focus on complex presentations and co-occurring trauma. She has expertise in cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and other evidence-based treatments, as well as specialized training and experience in providing family therapy to diverse populations of children, adolescents and their families. Dr. Stern is intensively trained in DBT, with almost 10 years of experience in providing individual and group DBT to adolescents and their families, while supervising and teaching students and clinicians in providing DBT services. In addition, she has taught and presented at academic medical centers and community mental health organizations on a variety of topics including the applications of DBT and behavioral approaches to family conflict, as well as child and teen depression, anxiety and self-injury. Dr. Stern has also participated in a first-of-its-kind intensive training in a new adaptation of DBT for children and preadolescents.

 

Tuesday, December 7, 2021; 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m. 

Resiliency in Childhood and Adolescents

The pandemic has presented unforeseen challenges for everyone. Resilience is the ability to mentally or emotionally cope with a crisis. Understanding and accepting change is critical to teaching and developing this skill over time.  This presentation will provide an overview of factors that contribute to resilience and provide strategies to promote coping skills that can be immediately applied to support students in today’s world.

Presented by: Cara Macari, LCSW, is a licensed clinical social worker for the Mood Disorders Center at the Child Mind Institute. She specializes in the evaluation and treatment of depression, emotional dysregulation and post-traumatic stress disorder, in addition to other mood and anxiety disorders in children, adolescents and young adults. Ms. Macari has expertise in cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), as well as trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy (TF-CBT) for the treatment of trauma and stressor-related disorders. As a certified Holistic Health Counselor, she has a particular interest in the connection between mind and body, mindfulness practice, and the importance of physical health in emotional well-being. Ms. Macari has extensive experience in working collaboratively with families, teachers and school systems, recognizing that individuals are deeply affected by their environments. By facilitating appropriately supportive environments, she believes children and adolescents can achieve their therapeutic goals and find success in all aspects of their lives. She has worked extensively in pediatric hospital inpatient and outpatient settings with medically complex patients suffering from mood and anxiety disorders, adjustment disorder, acute stress disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder, as well as with children with physical and developmental disabilities. She has led grief support groups for health professionals during the coronavirus pandemic and is the co-developer of a CBT-based psychotherapy group for children and adolescents struggling with mood and anxiety disorders and challenges related to the coronavirus quarantine and remote learning environments. Ms. Macari has completed training as a middle school social work intern, supporting both individuals and groups of preadolescents as they navigate family, social and academic stressors.  She has also facilitated a socialization group for students with ADHD and emotional challenges.

 

Thursday, December 9, 2021; 2:45 p.m. - 3:45 p.m. 

Educator Burnout and Stress Reduction 

 

Considering the incredible variety of student needs that educators are managing, educator stress levels are at an all-time high. Understanding the ripple effect of this stress across the school community and supporting each other with effective stress management strategies can be transformative in allowing educators to be at their best for the students that need them. This workshop provides educators with research-based strategies for self-care, including monitoring strong emotional reactions, combatting de-motivating or stress-inducing thinking patterns and setting effective goals, as well as mindfulness and relaxation techniques.

Presented by: Joanna R. Stern, PsyD., is a senior clinical psychologist and the director of the Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) Outpatient Program within the Mood Disorders Center at the Child Mind Institute. She has experience in the evaluation and treatment of children and adolescents across a variety of settings, including inpatient, residential, intensive and traditional outpatient psychotherapy. For over a decade, Dr. Stern has treated children and adolescents with mood disorders, with a special focus on complex presentations and co-occurring trauma. She has expertise in cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and other evidence-based treatments, as well as specialized training and experience in providing family therapy to diverse populations of children, adolescents and their families. Dr. Stern is intensively trained in DBT, with almost 10 years of experience in providing individual and group DBT to adolescents and their families, while supervising and teaching students and clinicians in providing DBT services. In addition, she has taught and presented at academic medical centers and community mental health organizations on a variety of topics including the applications of DBT and behavioral approaches to family conflict, as well as child and teen depression, anxiety and self-injury. Dr. Stern has also participated in a first-of-its-kind intensive training in a new adaptation of DBT for children and preadolescents.

 

Tuesday, January 25, 2022; 10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. 

Knowing the Whole Student 

Facilitated by a clinical psychologist, this session will explore the role DEIB programs play in the mental health of our school communities, namely how issues of race and class affect student mental health.  The session will ask participants to consider best practices for promoting emotional health and well-being for all students in the context of mounting social, psychological, and economic pressures on youth, families, and communities.  It will support learning about how our schools can know and support “the whole student,” with special attention to social and psychological issues that may affect low-income students, students of color -- and those occupying both identities -- who are attending affluent, white-majority schools.  Additionally, participants will challenge assumptions, learn what has worked, and share observations from our own schools.  This interactive experience will inspire participants to work together to improve our services and systems so students from all backgrounds can learn and thrive in our schools.

Presented by: Deborah Offner is a clinical psychologist and student affairs consultant who has taught and counseled Middle and Upper School students as well as college students for more than two decades. From 2003-2017, she served as Consulting Psychologist and subsequently Dean of Students at The Commonwealth School, an independent college preparatory school in Boston. She currently consults with independent school counselors, classroom teachers, senior administrators, and student affairs teams about mental health, school policy, and campus life. Dr. Offner also maintains an active clinical practice in a Boston suburb, where she specializes in adolescents, young adults, and their families.

 

Tuesday, January 25, 2022; 1:00 - 2:30 p.m.

Learn Well, Live Well, Lead Well: 

A Comprehensive Curricular Approach to Health and Wellness

Learn Well, Live Well, Lead Well is a comprehensive grade 3-12 integrated, interdisciplinary curriculum at Holton Arms School.  The curriculum directly addresses the school-wide goals and competencies that embrace Holton’s institutional priorities of Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, Health and Wellbeing, and Global Education.  This session will provide an overview of Learn Well, Live Well, Lead Well and considerations for curriculum design and implementation efforts, with ample time for questions and discussion.

Presented by: Stephanie Cordo, LW3 Seminar Curricular Coordinator 3-12, and Melissa Brown, Director of Diversity, Wellbeing, and Global Education at Holton Arms School, a Grade 3-12 independent school in Bethesda, MD.

 

Wednesday, January 26, 2022; 3:30 - 5:00 p.m.

Human Connection in an Educational Context 

Many of us chose the path to teach because we thrive from the human connection that occurs in a classroom. However, with this pandemic, connection has taken a hit.  Educators are often the first line of defense for their students’ mental, social, and emotional care. This interactive workshop will help to answer the question: How can we continue to build community and authentic connection in any classroom environment? Educators will learn the effects of stress and the importance of our stories as a way to build connection in the classroom. We will explore and practice six mindful strategies to incorporate in your classroom that will promote wellness. Using five common questions, we will actively reflect on the strategies implemented. Come prepared to center yourself and have your crayons/colored pencils ready to join in on the fun. Each technique, brain break, and tool provided will enhance connection and help you to meet the needs of your students and yourself. 

Presented by: Dr. Natasha Ward is an educational consultant, behavioral change health coach, and a virtual instructional coach with multiple organizations. She received her doctorate in School Improvement with concentrations in Educational Leadership and School Counseling from the University of West Georgia. With a Masters in Teaching from Georgia State University and a B.A. in Philosophy and a minor in Spanish from Spelman College, Dr. Natasha’s career spans across a variety of educational sectors. While teaching and consulting, she has guided, coached, and mentored pre-service and in-service teachers nationally and internationally on classroom management, culturally relevant and sustaining pedagogy, best instructional practices, mindfulness in the classroom, critical inquiry, and teaching the whole child. She has also presented at conferences on critical inquiry projects, whole-care practices for educational professionals, and the implementation of SEL practices in the classroom. Dr. Natasha has experience with grades K-12, however, her foundation is in lower schools (K-5). She ultimately desires to bridge the gap between community and home through project-based learning and critical inquiry, so that students and teachers are able to evolve, unveil, and transform more into their whole selves. A lifelong learner, Dr. Natasha is a certified personal and professional life coach with training in motivational interviewing and trauma-brain resiliency. She is the founder of Natasha Inspires, LLC which focuses on educators’ and busy professionals’ well-being. For Dr. Natasha, SelfCare is a lifestyle. She values progress over perfection. In her spare moments, you can find her in Georgia — drinking herbal tea, reading a romance novel, napping, reflecting/meditating in nature, chatting with loved ones, or just traveling the world. She does whatever nourishes her soul.

 
 

Wednesday, February 2, 2022; 1:00 - 2:30 p.m.

Developing a Trauma-Sensitive Classroom: Who Cares? 

Regardless of socio-economic status, race, or geographical location, trauma does not discriminate. Because trauma is so prevalent in homes and communities in every corner of the world, educators must assume that we will face the impacts of trauma in our classrooms. This session seeks to provide an introductory framework for understanding sources of trauma, realizing the impact of trauma on the brain and learning, identifying trauma in the classroom, and building resilience among students, all in an effort to foster a warm and nurturing trauma-sensitive classroom that can support emotional growth and wellness.  

Presented by: Anna Laughlin is the Executive Director of an international non-profit, Mission Equip, which seeks to provide professional development to educators and health-care workers in marginalized communities in the country of Belize and beyond.  She has  worked extensively teaching and supporting students and educators in low-income communities, both in the US and abroad, serving as a primary and secondary classroom teacher, art teacher, program facilitator, national curriculum specialist, teacher trainer, and published social studies textbook and curriculum writer. Her passion for underserved populations began as a child while living in Belize, as she bore witness to the challenges and trauma that are commonly experienced by those living in resource-limited communities. Pairing her knowledge gained from a Masters in Education in Trauma and Resilience in Educational Settings with a vast litany of experiences in classrooms in Detroit, Philadelphia, Anacostia D.C. Queens, rural America, the Middle East, Haiti, Africa, India, and Central America, Anna has been able to bring awareness to the need for a trauma-sensitive approach to teaching and learning. 

 

 

Tuesday, February 15, 2022; 10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Reconnecting to Our “Why” 

Educators have unique and powerful “why” that animates their work. But most teachers struggle to explain this purpose in clear words and stories. The disruptions of the last 18 months have caused us to lose connection to ourselves and others. We’ve been covered in dust. In this workshop, we will engage in a series of activities to explore our gifts, share stories with other inspiring educators, and map out our “why” via a personal action plan for the year ahead.  

Presented by: Ross Wehner is Founder of World Leadership School and TeachUNITED, which partners with a diverse range of K-12 schools to reimagine learning and create next-generation leaders. Ross is also Founding Partner of World Action Teams, the mission of which is to help corporations develop leaders who create value for business and society. Ross’ approach to leadership development integrates his work as a journalist, teacher and wilderness educator. As a journalist, Ross covered the end of Chile’s Pinochet regime for the San Francisco Chronicle in 1990. For the next five years, he reported from around Latin America on climate change, human rights, outdoor adventure and other topics for Mother Jones, Utne Reader, Outside, and other magazines. As a teacher, Ross worked at The Miller School in Crozet, Virginia, The Bush School in Seattle, and the University of Virginia, where he received an MA in Spanish American literature. Ross has also worked as a wilderness instructor for the National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS). Ross is working on a book exploring purpose learning in a range of K-12 schools, and has worked alongside Richard Leider in corporate leadership development programs designed to help executives develop a sense of purpose.

  
 

Tuesday, February 15; 1:00 - 2:30 p.m.

Support, Connection, and Meaning: Surviving as a School Leader in an Extended Collective Crisis

School management in 2020-21 relied on the strong emotional connections that sustained our school communities during an acute collective crisis. (“We’re all in this together.”) Now that we are fully back on campus, effective school leadership requires recognizing the impact of trauma and loss, building stronger connections, and supporting faculty-staff while we all recover and regroup, knowing that the COVID-19, racial justice, and economic crises are not fully behind us.  While tending to faculty-staff who continue to struggle with anxiety, fatigue, and complex personal obligations and circumstances, you likely have no room to consider your own needs, either.  Join us for guidance and conversation about how you can maintain morale, prevent burnout (for yourself as well as others), and continue to foster strong relationships, professional growth, and well-being for your colleagues -- and yourself.

Presented by: Deborah Offner, Ph.D. (see bio above)

 

 

Thursday, February 17, 2022; 10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. 

Meet the Parents: Understanding and Connecting with the “Other” Adults in Your Students’ Lives

Whether or not you were expecting them, here they are: at Back-to-School Night, parent-teacher conferences, on your playing fields, and in your offices. This workshop will highlight common dilemmas teachers, counselors, coaches, and administrators encounter with students’ parents; shed light on the practical and emotional challenges in contemporary families’ private lives; provide tips and strategies for managing difficult parent conversations; and explain why (and how) you should develop collaborative partnerships with parents in order to serve your students most effectively.

Presented by: Deborah Offner, Ph.D. (see bio above)

 

 

REGISTER HERE

 

 

This experience is made possible by the generosity of:

 

PLATINUM SPONSOR

ConnectOne Bank
301 Sylvan Avenue
Englewood Cliffs, NJ 07632
www.ConnectOneBank.com

Contact Person: Mark Cardone, First Senior Vice President: mcardone@cnob.com, 908-206-2860

ConnectOne Bank serves the financial needs of independent K-12 educational institutions in New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania and beyond. Recognized for outstanding client services and accessibility to decision-makers, ConnectOne Bank offers creative solutions including cash management services that typically reduce/eliminate bank service fees while increasing interest income on operating balances, school campus renovation and expansion financing (both taxable & tax-exempt) and a Bank-donation Affinity Program.

 

BRONZE SPONSOR
 

Behavioral Health-B logo_RGB_300 (003)

Atlantic Health System | Behavioral Health
465 South Street, Suite 204
Morristown, NJ 07096

Contact Person:
Lori Ann Rizzuto, LCSW, Executive Director
loriann.rizzuto@atlantichealth.org
973-660-3180